Skip to main content

tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  February 14, 2020 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

2:00 pm
hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm martine croxall. today at 2:00. a landmark free speech victory at the high court, for a man who was warned by police about allegedly transphobic messages on social media. this is a watershed moment for liberty. the police were wrong to visit my workplace, wrong to check my thinking. borisjohnson's new cabinet meets for the first time since yesterday's dramatic resignation of the chancellor sajid javid. we are here to deliver for the people of this country, who elected us to serve them. the people's government has to get on with delivering the people's priorities, and in the next few years we must get on with our basic work. the number of cases of mumps in england — at its highest for a decade. coming up on afternoon live
2:01 pm
all the sport with holly — more t20 action between england and south africa — another close—run thing? after wednesday's one run defeat — england's cricketers have it all to prove in their second t20 international in south africa. we'll be looking ahead to this afternoon's showdown in durban. thanks, holly, and tomasz has all the weather — last weekend it was a storm called ciara, this time it's one called dennis. ciara, this time it's facility ciara, this time it's and three days of dennis, facility and three days of dennis, in fact, voracious conditions will ta ke in fact, voracious conditions will take us into monday, disruption and damage and flooding once again likely —— ferocious conditions. thanks, tomasz. also coming up — how did a mafia boss go from the streets of naples to hiding out in a lancashire caravan park? hello, everyone. this is afternoon live — i'm martine croxall. in a landmark case on freedom
2:02 pm
of expression, a high courtjudge has warned police against acting like the gestapo or the stasi when they investigate allegedly transphobic comments on social media. thejudge ruled that humberside police acted disproportionately when they turned up at harry miller's place of work and told him his tweets about tra nsgender people were a "hate incident." the judge said the police visit had a potentially chilling effect on free speech, saying "we have never lived in an orwellian society." our legal correspondent clive coleman is at the high court. talk us through what's been happening. well, harry miller believes that a man cannot become a woman and he says he tweets and blogs as part of a public discussion about the reform of the gender recognition act, that is the act under which a man can legally be recognised as a woman and vice ve rsa . recognised as a woman and vice
2:03 pm
versa. there is a very heated discussion about proposed reforms. at the moment, the criteria are stringent and the proposals they should become less so. he tweets in a way some people would find offensive, he uses pretty crude language, swearwords, body parts and so language, swearwords, body parts and so forth. in january 2019 language, swearwords, body parts and so forth. injanuary 2019 a trans woman complained about his tweets. that led humberside police to go to his place of work, they eventually interviewed him over the phone and warned him if he continued to tweet in the way he had been, then he could be prosecuted as a result. the incident was logged as a normal crime hate incident. that isn't without consequence because it can be disclosed on an enhanced disclosure and barring check —— non—crime hate incident. harry miller reviewed the guidance and
2:04 pm
behaviour of humberside police. the guidance grew out of the stephen lawrence case, that tragic case, and the idea behind it is you dampen down hate incidents before they escalate into full—blown hate crimes. hejudicially reviewed both the guidance on the behaviour of humberside police. today mrjustice julian mills ruled the guidance was entirely lawful but the way it had been applied by the police was a disproportionate interference with harry miller's right to freedom of expression. harry miller was delighted. we have never had a gestapo or a stasi in great britain. but the actions of humberside police came too close for comfort. this is a watershed moment for liberty. the police were wrong to visit my workplace, wrong to check my thinking, wrong in their attempt to
2:05 pm
force me the stone wall and now the labour party trans rights pledge. the words ofjustice julian labour party trans rights pledge. the words ofjusticejulian knowles will be seen as a robust defence of the right to freedom of expression and he talked in his ruling about the right to be offensive in what you say. he said freedom of speech which is entirely inoffensive is a right not worth having. that is not the view of everybody in terms of this case and the trans community, we have spoken to a number of groups researching this story and they have reacted in a different way. this is helen belcher. i think trans people will be worried it could become open season on us because the court didn't really define the threshold for acceptable speech. i think it will reinforce an opinion that the courts don't really
2:06 pm
understand trans lives and aren't there to protect trans people. the wording of this judgment i think will be studied very carefully by police forces around the country, because it really sets the tone of what is completely free and legitimate comment online in particular. i think it will determine when people make a complaint whether the police to investigate and whether they lock this as a non—crime hate incident. something like an excess of 25,000 non—crime hate incidents are locked each year. this is a big issue for the police and they will be picking over the ruling very carefully. there is a part of this case being referred to the supreme court, tell us referred to the supreme court, tell us about that. well, harry miller is determined to take his battle on tv
2:07 pm
supreme court. that is not a pretty early stage at this point but the whole issue of the logging of these non—crime hate incidents, and they do have a consequence, of course, we are not just do have a consequence, of course, we are notjust talking about transphobic non—crime hate incidents, the vast majority relates to non—crime race hate incidents, disability hate incidents because those communities are far bigger than the trans community. as far as the legal process is concerned, we are seeing more and more legal challenges around the issue. there was an employment tribunal recently where a woman had effectively said that a man can't become a woman, similarto that a man can't become a woman, similar to what harry miller had said, and sought to have that belief that she held recognised as a philosophical belief akin to a religion. she lost that case, that case could conceivably also go to
2:08 pm
appeal. these issues are being chewed over by the courts in employment tribunal, the high court and harry miller has said he has plans to take some of these issues to the supreme court but that is in early stages at the moment. thank you. the number of people diagnosed with mumps in england is the highest for a decade. 5,000 cases were confirmed last year — almost five times more than the year before. public health england says it's partly down to people not getting the mmr vaccine in the 1990s and early 2000s. tim muffett reports. i would literally be screaming from being in pain. lectures, essays, the odd party, and mumps — flora, ben and 0llie's second year at leeds university hasn't gone quite to plan. i went to bed normal, like, normal chin, fine, everything fine. but then i woke up and, bang, my face was just puffed out, so swollen. were you surprised as to how painful it was? i got prescribed morphine, it was that bad.
2:09 pm
it started out with just pain in my ear and jaw. and then, it kind of started swelling. so painful. like, yourjaw pretty much locks and i could open my mouth this much. brushing my teeth, felt a lump around here and started swelling up. yeah, had pretty fat face. other students who have had mumps have been sharing before and after photos. the number of cases in england is at its highest level in a decade and many universities and colleges have seen outbreaks. there were more than 5,000 laboratory—confirmed cases of mumps last year — almost five times the number seen in 2018. last month alone, there were nearly three times as many cases as the previous january. today's young adults were born in the late ‘90s and early 2000s and was when the measles, mumps and rubella vaccination was incorrectly linked to autism, creating a panic amongst parents. now, the link has been proved to be
2:10 pm
false, but many children missed out on their mmr jab. the cohort of young people who weren't vaccinated are now at university, getting to know each other, sharing their bugs, and that's meant we've seen this huge increase in cases. around half of mumps cases last year were amongst unvaccinated people, according to public health england. but many, like flora, ben and ollie, did have the mmrjab and the follow—up booster. and yet, they still got mumps. the challenge is that the mumps element of the vaccine isn't quite as effective as it is for measles and rubella. the more people that are vaccinated, the harder it is for the bugs to get around to be shared in the first place. so, even if you have had two mmr jabs, you could still potentially get mumps, partly because a lot of people didn't and, therefore, the virus is more prevalent. precisely. mumps typically passes with no lasting damage. those who have had an mmr jab are less likely to suffer serious complications.
2:11 pm
on rare occasions, it can lead to hearing loss, viral meningitis, and infertility in men. anyone unsure if they've had an mmrjab or booster is advised to see a doctor. with vaccinations, it's never too late to catch up. tim muffett, bbc news. after 2:30, we will speak to dr vanessa saliba from public health england for more on the reasons behind the rise in cases of mumps. borisjohnson's new cabinet has been meeting for the first time since yesterday's dramatic reshuffle which saw sajid javid resign as chancellor. the prime minister told his new team they have to get on with delivering the government's priorities. at his side was rishi sunak — his new chancellor — who's due to deliver his first budget in just a few weeks' time. here's our political correspondent iain watson. a new cabinet and borisjohnson would like us to think it is also a new government, one with different priorities from the previous conservative administrations. we are here to deliver for the people of this country who elected us to serve them,
2:12 pm
the people's government has to get on with delivering the people's priorities. borisjohnson's new next door neighbour at number 11 downing st is a former investment banker, rishi sunak, and he has to find the cash for number 10's plans. this new cabinet minister says appointing a chancellor with a seat in yorkshire demonstrates a commitment to northern england. very pleased to have another northerner sitting round the cabinet table. we are proud of ourselves up north and fighting that tory fight. many more of us now, but to have rishi there will be a great asset. but rishi sunak, unlike his predecessor sajid javid, has had to accept sharing his staff with number 10. what was proposed, it is now going to happen, is that we bring together the back—office teams that help to advise the prime minister at number 10 and those that advise the chancellor, and i think that's sensible because as i say, we have a lot to do. number 10 insists it didn't want sajid javid to leave number 11.
2:13 pm
in fact, they even tried to persuade him that having a joint advisory team between number 10 and number 11 would actually give the treasury more influence at the heart of government. he was obviously unconvinced. but for boris johnson, his priorities mattered far more than the personnel around his cabinet table. a former adviser to sajid javid said he was given an offer that he had to refuse. sajid rightly understood that not having his own political advice would be incredibly detrimental to his decision—making power. are you running numberii as well as number 10? boris johnson's key adviser dominic cummings ran the vote leave campaign and some say he is keen to take back control from number 10's potential political rivals. firstly, it is about control as to where the power lies between number 10 and the treasury. i think if it ends up that they have
2:14 pm
more joined up working together as we had under cameron and 0sborne that would be a very good thing. if it ends up in the kind of space where the treasury to some degree is being neutered, and it has a key function in terms of being a custodian of the public finances, then i think that will be more problematic. how many nurses are we recruiting? 50,000. exactly. how many more buses? laughter. boris johnson is under pressure from mps to spend more in their areas so when the new chancellor delivers his first budget, we will see just how loose the purse strings are going to be. let's speak now to the political commentator the date of the budget was meant to be much the 11th which may have to shift. i don't think it's going to change that dramatically, i think it will still happen before the end of
2:15 pm
the financial year, before the end of march. there were from downing street is that preparations are continuing apace. —— the word from downing street. 0ne continuing apace. —— the word from downing street. one advantage of putting rishi sunak in thejob is it was “— putting rishi sunak in thejob is it was —— he was sajid javid's number two at the treasury. he already worked on the detail and to some extent number10 can hit the ground running. they've got to get the background of these two teams in place as well. they are giving themselves a bit of leeway by not really tying themselves down to a specific date. the other question is with all the pressure on the prime minister, from some of these newly elected conservative mps in seats that have been labour since the war, they been asking for things for their local areas to make sure they are not just their local areas to make sure they are notjust mps whether it is
2:16 pm
opening railway lines, putting more money into the local health service. we could perhaps then see a change of tack in the budget with the taps of tack in the budget with the taps of public spending turned on a bit more. i don't think it's going to be some kind of free for all because i'm also told that a cabinet this morning the prime minister was emphasising precisely what sajid javid was telling individual departments, that they have to look for 5% savings. that tends to suggest what boris johnson wants for 5% savings. that tends to suggest what borisjohnson wants to do is we divert money into what he calls the people's priorities, whether that is more buses outside london or more police on the streets, but he will take some of that money at least from elsewhere. in other words, he won't necessarily runa in other words, he won't necessarily run a coach and horses through the fiscal rules of the government. we will know more about that in a few weeks' time. the other thing that is interesting is what is going on behind the scenes. most people would ca re less
2:17 pm
behind the scenes. most people would care less whether some special adviser is moving here or there but what we are seeing effectively is downing street trying to make up the fiefdoms of ministers, not tying some of the officials to specific ministers, moving them around a bit and therefore exercising more control from number 10. i and therefore exercising more control from number10. ithink and therefore exercising more control from number 10. i think that is going to be the start of a process which sees a bigger reorganisation in government. as one insider said, they've got rid of the baby table around the cabinet. i think we would see something a bit more dramatic in the months to come. not much room for ego at the moment. thank you. let's speak now to the political commentator and former conservative adviser, jo—anne nadler. she joins us from westminster. we will talk about the tension between number 10 and number 11 in a moment but festival what happened in the northern ireland office with julian smith? —— first of all. how
2:18 pm
far—reaching will be effects of that be? it seems as though julian smith was highly regarded by all parties within northern ireland and that is a pretty difficult thing for somebody in his position to have achieved. particularly in such a short period of time. so, there are questions being asked about why julian smith has had to go this time and suggestion seems to be he perhaps wasn't perceived as being as loyal to the prime minister and his particular take on how policy should develop in this area as presumably his replacement is perceived to be. but with the power—sharing back up and running, to some extent, the good workjulian smith has achieved is under way, and we will have to see how it develops. so, the issue
2:19 pm
between the teams who work in number 10 and number11, between the teams who work in number 10 and number 11, how far is too far in centralising power? it's fine what everyone is getting along and doing what you want but if the wheels come off you could find, borisjohnson could find himself with more opposition than he needed, surely? well, i don't think you can blame the prime minister and his tea m blame the prime minister and his team for wanting to have a firm grip across the whole of government. i think we would be surprised if they didn't want to do that at this point, having come in with such a big majority and such a strong mandate. in many ways, i think it is quite admirable that the prime minister has shown himself to be so unsentimental, so able to make tough decisions. in telling everybody in you then have genuine dissent that comes to light over policy in the
2:20 pm
coming weeks and months, it is a more explosive situation potentially. i think obviously it is to avoid that that these kind of moves have been taken. sajid javid said out of self respect he couldn't continue. how much freedom will rishi sunak have, and self respect for that matter? i've no reason to doubt he has plenty of self respect and as it should sajid javid who i think has emerged extremely well from this. he is by all accounts a very decent guy and has been very loyal to his team. i think it was interesting the discussion that preceded this conversation from one of the experts in your film, he was talking about the necessity for number 11 particularly to have independent political advice. i think it's important that the treasury ministers have very strong economic and financial and fiscal advice but i can see why number 10
2:21 pm
feels it is very important they are all singing from the same hymn sheet if not actually literally. but they are all sticking to the same political agenda. i think the sum right on both sides of this argument. what is wrong with having someone argument. what is wrong with having someone in number 11 who is more independently minded, offering checks and balances and acting as a break sometimes under critical friend? that is absolutely vital and if what has happened over the last 24 if what has happened over the last 2a hours is to try and stamp that out, that is a problem but where i think number 11 needs to be independent is in bringing that scrutiny over fiscal policy and economic policy across the board, as far as the government is concerned. it does need the chancellor and ministers to be able to stand back and say, we can't afford to do this 01’ and say, we can't afford to do this or this has taken the economy down the wrong route. that is not
2:22 pm
specifically political advice and i come back to the idea its not necessarily unreasonable for number 10 to want number 11 to share the same political agenda and the same political priorities. after all, we've seen a kind of approach working pretty well, most recently under george osborne and david cameron. thank you. the scottish conservatives have a new leader. jackson carlaw, who has been interim leader since the resignation of ruth davidson in august, received more than three times the votes of the only other candidate, michelle ballantyne. the court of appeal has ruled that an estranged muslim couple, who'd had an islamic wedding ceremony and had four children, cannot legally divorce because their marriage isn't recognised in law. an earlier ruling had accepted that their vows were similar to those of a british marriage contract. dan johnson has been following proceedings.
2:23 pm
tell us about the background to this. there is a lot to understand. it is complicated and one thing to set out from the beginning is that one way of securing a divorce is to have a marriage declared null and void. in effect, that it never legally existed because it was entered into on a false premise and thatis entered into on a false premise and that is what the women in this case, nasreen akhtar, was arguing. she said they had gone through an islamic ceremony with the intention but would be endorsed with a second civil ceremony which would have been marriage recognised in law. her case was that because that process wasn't completed to its full conclusion, the marriage should have been regarded as null and void in the eyes of the law which would have then meant she was entitled some sort of financial settlement. the headline this ruling is that the court of appeal can't rule that marriage to be null and void because
2:24 pm
it never existed, it doesn't regard even the first stage of the process, the islamic ceremony, as having any legal recognition whatsoever. that goes against the judgment in favour of the woman before. this woman nasreen akhtar and the man she regarded as her husband, they went through the first islamic ceremony in 1998 through the first islamic ceremony in1998 and through the first islamic ceremony in 1998 and then spent the next 18 yea rs in 1998 and then spent the next 18 years living together. they called each other husband and wife and had four children together, they spent five years living in dubai and were recognised as a married couple there. these were all arguments advanced on behalf of nasreen akhtar but she has been unsuccessful in her case. the court of appeal says it finds that the 1998 nikah ceremony didn't create a marriage. the
2:25 pm
parties were not marrying under the provisions of english law, the ceremony wasn't performed in eight registered building, no certificates have been issued, no registrar was present and further they knew that the ceremony had no legal effect and they would need to undertake another ceremony in order to be validly married. i think the fallout from this is that if you want the protection of the law when a relationship breaks down, you need to make sure you do the right thing in law at the time you get married. you cannot rely on a religious ceremony that doesn't have the legal protection to give you those rights if the marriage breaks down later. how many other people could find themselves in a similar position, thinking they are married but legally they are not? it isn't clear but there certainly are other couples in that situation who think they may have some degree of protection because of the ceremony they have gone through and there has been a lot of interest in this case, lots of people suggesting this might
2:26 pm
set a precedent that could affect a lot of other couples. we will have to see how wide the implications are and how many other people are affected by this but it is a case that sparked a lot of interest and the attorney general was actually supporting the husband, the man's case, even though the couple had reached a settlement between them, the attorney general still had an interest, essentially wanting to secure the fact that if you want a marriage that is recognised by the law, you need to get through the proper processes at the start. a ceremony that doesn't qualify can't later be relied on to give you that sort of protection when a marriage brea ks sort of protection when a marriage breaks up. thank you. lcoming up on afternoon live. coming up on afternoon live. music that's the song for
2:27 pm
the new bond film, recorded by 18—year—old billie eilish. we'll find out how it's gone down with the critics. time for a look at the weather. i can't believe it's only a week ago we we re i can't believe it's only a week ago we were talking about storm ciara and now we are moving on to storm dennis. exactly a week on, last friday we were having a similar discussion about how powerful the jet stream is and this storm actually has the potential to bring more rainfall this time so that is the area of concern. the met office is concerned some northern and western parts of the country could see well over a months worth of rainfall. we could see flooding of properties, businesses, underpasses and that sort of thing. nasty. we've actually got two storms out there across the atlantic right now. this
2:28 pm
very dramatic pattern is not actually storm dennis. this is another storm that has formed recently and this storm is impacting iceland at the moment. there are warnings in places like reykjavik for hurricane force winds. that is 12 on the beaufort scale. this isn't a hurricane but the strength of the wind is similar. 0n a hurricane but the strength of the wind is similar. on top of that, a lot of snow. we are feeling the end of it here, the cold front moving across the country right now. just that one happening? it doesn't have a name but it's pretty certain that had it been going right over us it would have had a name as well. but storm dennis is actually still way out towards the other side of the atlantic. we were talking about that cold front stretching right across the atlantic and here it is again. it really is deja vu. it is so similarto
2:29 pm
it really is deja vu. it is so similar to what we saw last week. how unusual is that? obviously we have to go back into records, but certainly i can't remember the last time we saw such a similar pattern in the space of a week. i think this is where storm dennis is forming right now. the winds in storm dennis, they are going to be very, very powerful and that speaks of a very powerful and that speaks of a very steep pressure gradient. that is right. what we often show in forecasts is pressure patterns. they are lines, it's a bit like a topographical map. i will show it to you now. this is right now. these lines are basically lines of pressure and the more lines you see, we are getting a second to a bull's—eye which is what we quite often referred to in meteorology in loose terms. it is almost like a
2:30 pm
sink ora loose terms. it is almost like a sink or a black hole. the more lines you see, the faster the wind spins into it and basically the close of the lines are, the steeper the gradient. i've got a prop to show you. we love a prop. a skinny spinner. i don't know if you can see that. basically in the forecast, the faster it goes, the close these lines will be. so, the thinking is that in this storm it may actually be the rain that could be the bigger problem but the winds are going to be very similar. it makes me wonder what other gadgets you've got! laughter we had a bit of fun with that but now the serious message begins
2:31 pm
because it may well be quite a problematic weekend for us. notjust that we can but the bad weather may also carry on into monday as well. i think the basic message is that over a period of three days, different parts of the country will be experiencing different severity of weather at different times. it may well be the rainfall that affects you for a day also, the following day it may the wind. it isa it is a very complicated storm that will be happening over a period of three days. i would not concentrate too much on how fast exactly the wind is in the forecast or where the various blobs of rain go. this is a very changeable and dynamic situation. the basic message, because the storm is so big across the atlantic, this is sunday, it
2:32 pm
will barrelled across the uk. because it is so wide, it will take a good three days before it passes. 0n a good three days before it passes. on sunday, some of the heaviest rain will be in the south. some northern areas could see big amounts of rainfall. the storm is likely to have a sting in its tail during the course of sunday night into monday where we could see nasty winds across more northern parts of the uk. 0nce across more northern parts of the uk. once again it is nationwide throughout the uk we will be feeling the effects of the storm. particularly heavy rain across northern, western and southern areas. severe gales throughout the country possible and the risk of disruption is pretty likely.
2:33 pm
this is bbc news. our latest headlines... a landmark free speech victory at the high court, for a man who was warned by police about allegedly transphobic messages on social media. borisjohnson's new cabinet meets for the first time since yesterday's dramatic resignation of the chancellor, sajid javid. police in new zealand say they've found the body of stephanie simpson, the british woman, who's been missing since monday. the number of cases of mumps in england is its highest for a decade after a number of outbreaks in universities and colleges. sport now on afternoon live with holly.
2:34 pm
england's cricketers have something to prove in south africa. england's cricketers are back in action in south africa this afternoon, and they've got something to prove. yes, it's the second of three t20 internationals in durban later and for england the'll be hoping to improve on their performance in east london on wednesday. when they let victory slip through theirfingers, they were chasing seven in the final over, and lost by a single run. keeping in mind, this side will be firmly focussed on the t20 world cup later this year, so eoin morgan's men will be looking to showjust what they're capable of — every player looking to secure their place in that squad in october, among them chrisjordan — a t20 regular, and depsite the slip up on wednesday, he feels england are ready for this autumn's tournament. this team now has been together in one form for quite some time now. there is a lot of experience in the tea m there is a lot of experience in the team and a lot of the guys in the tea m team and a lot of the guys in the team have played in a lot of cricket around the world. being put under
2:35 pm
immense pressure at various times in their career. as a team we are in a good place and, like anything with tournaments and anything, we want to be gathering momentum going into the tournament. the match gets under way at 4 o'clock, so not long to wait to see how england get on. i was iwasa i was a bit bewitched by all the lovely sunshine. there is a chance one of liverpool's he—man could be playing for egypt. that is right. mo salah has been put in the provisional squad, the final of which clashes with the start of the premier league. a huge dilemma from —— forjurgen klopp, who says he wa nts —— forjurgen klopp, who says he wants more information. doi
2:36 pm
do i want to lose a player pre—season? 0f do i want to lose a player pre—season? of course not but we have to consider different things. we are completely clear about what we want. we need more information. speaking of the olympics... the world health organisation has insisted there is no case for relocating or cancelling tokyo 2020 because of the coronavirus outbreak. with a number of sporting events across asia being affected, there were fears the olympics and paralympics could also be hit. the ioc has been told it should be able to go ahead as planned. it just reinforced our itjust reinforced our confidence that the measures being taken by the releva nt that the measures being taken by the relevant authorities are properly addressing the situation, along with china and that we will be able to ensure obviously that the games go ahead and that they go ahead in a way that is safe for the athletes
2:37 pm
and the spectators. world number one rory mcilroy will tee off at around quarter to eight tongiht in the second round of the pga tour event in california, hoping to build on an impressive start. he's tied for seventh — four shots behind leader matt kuchar. meanwhile, england's jodi ewart shadoff says she must remain patient as she heads into the weekend at the australian open in a share of the lead. five birdies in her second round put her level with former world number one inbee park. ronnie 0'sullivan is through to the semi finals at the welsh 0pen snooker. he breezed past mark selby 5—1 and looked in supremely impressive form, racing into a 4—0 lead, which included a break of 142 in frame two. neil robertson is in action next, taking on kyren wilson.
2:38 pm
public health england has confirmed that a person diagnosed with the coronavirus attended a transport conference in central london last week. more than 200 delegates have been informed, but told their risk of infection is low. labour mp for leeds north west, alex sobel confirmed in a statement today that he attended the conference and has cancelled all of his engagements until next week when the 14—day potential incubation will be over. meanwhile, health officials in china have reported 121 more deaths from the coronavirus outbreak bringing the total number to almost 1,400. the number of confirmed cases of the virus rose by more than 5,000. but the world health organisation says cases are not rising dramatically outside china despite a spike in hubei province. a former italian mafia boss, who was found hiding in a caravan park in lancashire, has told the bbc about the british businessmen who helped the mafia make millions of pounds through fraud. gennaro panzuto is a state witness whose evidence has helped convict
2:39 pm
former members of the camorra family criminal syndicate in naples. this report from dominic casciani. the secrets are being unlocked, a rare insight into one of the world's most powerful mafia gangs. i'm meeting gennaro panzuto, a camorra leader who murdered and is now confessing all. translation: one thing i do remember is the dull thud of the bodies falling after you've shot them. they're asking you to kill somebody. did you not think, that's the wrong thing to do? translation: no, when you grow up in a context like mine, for lots of kids like me, it's normal. panzuto was a teenage street thief, who rose through the ranks to become a boss. in 2006, he was suspected of multiple murders as clan warfare erupted.
2:40 pm
at the time, gennaro panzuto was for sure a dangerous criminal in naples in italy. he went on the run to northern england where local businessmen hid him on this caravan park and helped him make money for the mafia. they'd set up companies to dodge tax on goods sold both at home and in naples by the camorra. it's known as carousel fraud. carousel fraud is really, really profitable. it is a good tool even to money—launder or to move money from a country to another. so, it's really important to organised crime groups? yeah, it's a paradise. in 2007, panzuto was captured. he took the rare step of cooperating with prosecutors, telling them about his british helpers, but no—one was arrested. in his home city, naples, panzuto's evidence has helped the fight against the camorra. we're out on patrol with police
2:41 pm
on some of the toughest estates. 0lder mob leaders are in jail, but the clans, many led by teenagers, are still active. this is a place of drugs. yes, it's a place where drugs are sold. this is a constant daily battle for these police officers who are on the naples flying squad trying to stop these types of crime, drug dealing, and the fear is that the money made here is funnelled into some of the most dangerous crime groups in the world. in a prison at the other end of italy, panzuto thinks the camorra is finished. but why did he turn against them? translation: for love of my partner, for love of my children. what's the personal price for you in doing that? too much. too much? too much. he will soon be released, but he'll
2:42 pm
always be looking over his shoulder. dominic casciani, bbc news, northern italy. let's return to one of our main stories. the number of people diagnosed with mumps in england is the highest for a decade. 5,000 cases were confirmed last year — almost five times more than the year before. we arejoined by dr vanessa saliba consultant epidemiologist at public health england. thank you for coming in. why are we seeing this spike now and particularly, it seems, among university and college students? the current spike is being driven by outbreaks in colleges and universities. pretty much all the cases are in people between 15 and even up to 35 who missed out on the measles, mumps and rubella
2:43 pm
vaccination whenever younger and they are all together at university and it is a good environment for spreading the infection and that is why we are seeing an increase in tempo macro at the moment. young people should check they are up to date with their vaccinations. —— in mumps at the moment. there was a lot of controversy, not scientifically backed, about the mmr vaccine. these young people were born in the late 90s, early 2000, and at that time the uptake of the vaccine dropped to about 20% of the lowest we have ever had in this country and we are still paying the price for it now. nowadays as well, we still offer the mmr vaccine two or one—year—olds, the first dose and then a second dose when they start school. it is important everyone gets the vaccine that the right time. if you check in with your parents and guardians and
2:44 pm
they say we did not have you done now we realise we publish should have, what should they do? they should check with their gp practice. they should have a record. if they have no record, get caught up now. it is completely free on the nhs. there is no upper age limit. if you are not sure, there is no harm in getting extra doses. it is safe and effective and the best way to make sure you do get mumps. it is not very nice, is it? not at all. you getjoint ache and headache and then you get swelling over here on either side of the cheeks, a swelling of the parotid side of the cheeks, a swelling of the pa rotid gland side of the cheeks, a swelling of the parotid gland which can be rather painful. it takes a week or two to resolve. if you have the symptoms you should contact your gp or 111. there can be complications and some people can end up in hospital. that is why it is important to have the vaccine. these
2:45 pm
photos are almost like some of the filters you can use on your phone but these are real pictures, aren't they? the current uptake of the mmr vaccine is pretty good, 95% uptake of the first dose. we want people to get the vaccine as soon as possible when they turn one. having two doses ensures you have long—term protection. and it is free, as you say, on the nhs. thank you for coming in. thank you. pop star billie eilish has recorded the title track for the newjames bond film, no time to die. the us singer, who turned 18 last month, is the youngest artist in history to write and record a theme for the franchise. the song was released at midnight , at the same time as a new trailer for the film, starring daniel craig. name... bond. james bond. # that i'd fallen for a lie
2:46 pm
# you were never on my side # fool me once, fool me twice # are you death or paradise? # now you'll never see me cry # there's just no time to die.# i'm joined now by film and tv composer andrew swarbrick. what is your verdict?” what is your verdict? i really love it. things are being pushed forward with new things. billie eilish is never afraid to break the rules. i
2:47 pm
was really pleased i did not try to reinvent the wheel and what they have done feels like an extension to what has gone before. it is interesting, the guardian picked up on that vague hint on diamonds are forever what i heard were similarities with the more recent songs of having a minor chord with an ascending baseline. and then there is the use of the classic minor chord with the major ninth, which is at the end. that is what the track is hugely based on. i think it is great and it has done really well and i love billie ‘s voice. how big is the pressure for writing a bond theme, which is going
2:48 pm
to be heard by millions and millions of people for years on end?” to be heard by millions and millions of people for years on end? i can only imagine it because i have not beenin only imagine it because i have not been in that position. i can... it must be pretty immense to have that. at the age of 18, it is just amazing that she has had that opportunity. i think she has really done a good job and she has written to the challenge. i think it is a great song. what you are trying to do is create anyone that does not get on peoples nerves. it sounds a simple tune but there is a lot of complexity in it. that is right. it grabs you straightaway. 0f complexity in it. that is right. it grabs you straightaway. of course they are accessing the original theme, which everyone loves and has been with us for 50 years. i think they did well to have hints of that
2:49 pm
in and people are going to sort of like it for that reason as well. the lyrics and the melody is really sympathetic to and has the characteristics of the great bond theme. you can hear the influences we are familiar with from previous ones. when you are given a commission, how clear are the people asking you to write a piece of music, about what they really want? that is one of the difficulties. you had to see beyond what might be being said to you. people try and explain things in musical terms but thatis explain things in musical terms but that is subjective. the best thing is to get into the head of the director you are working with and digest what they are trying to do. then you need to go away and try and ca ptu re then you need to go away and try and capture that any of notes. that is the key. there is a great quote from
2:50 pm
monty norman, the guy that wrote the original theme, where he said, talking about bond, he said his sexiness, his mystery and ruthlessness all in a view notes. that is why it is such a great thing. a view notes and instantly recognisable. the story is there. —— few notes. when you are drawing from that you are starting from a really good place. that is why i am really pleased they have not tried to reinvent the wheel and tried to fit in. thank you for talking to us. all the business news in a bit. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. a landmark free speech victory at the high court, for a man who was warned by police
2:51 pm
about allegedly transphobic messages on social media. borisjohnson's new cabinet meets for the first time since yesterday's dramatic resignation of the chancellor, sajid javid. the number of cases of mumps in england is its highest for a decade after a number of outbreaks in universities and colleges. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. royal bank of scotland is changing its name later this year to natwest. natwest is one of the bank brands rbs owns. it also owns ulster bank. it's thought that the name change is designed to help break its association with the financial crisis. the bank was rescued by the government in 2008 in the aftermath of that. it is still 62% state—owned. today it also said profits doubled to £3.1 billion tesco has been told not to illegally block rival supermarkets from buying its land or leasing nearby sites. a competition investigation found that on 23 occasions the uk's biggest supermarket chain blocked access to rivals using restrictive contracts.
2:52 pm
tesco has agreed to take action to avoid this in the future. the supermarket giant blamed "administrative errors" and said it had strengthened its "controls and training." broadband, tv and phone customers will be given the chance to avoid price rises when their contracts end under rules that come in on saturday. uk watchdog 0fcom says users could save £150 a year on broadband alone — once they have checked out available alternative deals. around 20 million customers are out of contract with their suppliers and could switch to something cheaper. something of thawing of the trade war between the us and china is taking place. they've cut the tariffs — import taxes — and a lot of goods they sell to each other. this has been backwards and forwards fulsome months. china responded by
2:53 pm
cutting tariffs on goods going the other way, $75 billion worth of goodsin other way, $75 billion worth of goods in its case. some positive steps forward for fans of free trade. and we have also had news from the us, one step forward, two steps back, the trade situation seems to be coming but the us has still got it in for huawei, bringing new charges against them. we will find out more from that from michelle, who are standing by in new york for us. are you there? fantastic. tell us more about the charges. prosecutors in brooklyn yesterday, federal prosecutors, added new charges against huawei and its us subsidiaries. it accused it of racketeering and conspiracy to
2:54 pm
steal trade secrets from us —based companies. six american companies, it listed in the complaint, saying it listed in the complaint, saying it use the information for its own gain. this is in addition to the long list of criminal accusations in the case which were first filed in august of 2018 grab including bank fraud, wire fraud, conspiracy to defraud the united states. huawei denied the charges in a statement and said it was an attempt by the american government to damage its reputation and business. very aggressive language here. they are waging a war, if you like, against huawei on a number of fronts. the rationale behind it all is national security concerns. you are seeing the ramifications of that playing out in this particular court case, which is taking place not far from where i am standing. the charges
2:55 pm
being brought by brooklyn federal prosecutors. you have the founder's daughter and there are plans to extradite her to the united states to face charges. you had the uk and germany recently agreeing or moving forward questioning it will continue to do business with huawei and the us still has not given up to try to discourage this. we have seenjust re ce ntly discourage this. we have seenjust recently speaking at a conference in munich, robert blair, who is the white house special representative or international relations again saying that the us government will try to partner with the telecoms industry to come up with an alternative to huawei. all of this is the battle for the next generation of the internet and that is by g. thank you for taking us through that situation. let's see
2:56 pm
what has been going on here. not a lot for the dowjones. it has opened flat. 0il not a lot for the dowjones. it has opened flat. oil prices have been doing well, getting on for almost 2% now the us markets havejoined in. again for the us benchmark oil price. the royal bank of scotland, as he had earlier in the headlines, the company has doubled its profits and is changing its way to natwest. shares are doing very badly, down 6%. now it's time for a look at the weather. for some other cities once again the calm before the storm. this one is called dennis. last weekend we had ciara. the met office has an amber warning in force for the likely heavy rain that is going to
2:57 pm
accompany the storm, particularly across northern, western and southern areas. if you want the details, their specific locations of the amber warning areas, it is best to go online. there is not enough time in the forecast are going to all of that. this is not storm dennis, it is this one here that is starting to develop. we are starting to feel the effects of the giant low across the south during the course of the night there is some rain. here specifically storm dennis, the outer edges, as it approaches ireland. freshening during the course of saturday morning and the bad weather will continue to trundle towards other parts of the country as well. a lot of heavy rain. some southern, some south—western areas, maybe wales and parts of yorkshire, the south of scotland. that is where the south of scotland. that is where the amber warnings are in force. we could see 80 millimetres of rain or more, over a months worth of rain falling in one event. 0n
2:58 pm
more, over a months worth of rain falling in one event. on top of that severe gales as well put force inland. how their wins will compare to the storm we had last weekend we re to the storm we had last weekend were some areas may be a little less, other areas about the same. their basic message, this is a very large storm. it is stretching from greenland and a cold front almost all the way down the azores. you can see all of their mess with their wins barrelling through the uk. it will come in waves. maybe for a time on sunday there could be a little bit of sunshine around as well. it is not going to be one continuous speu is not going to be one continuous spell of high winds and heavy rain. a separate wave is expected sunday night into monday across scotland, down into yorkshire and the midlands as well. here is the summary over a period of around three days or so. we are expecting very heavy rain
2:59 pm
potentially in some areas. severe gales, particularly around coasts. certainly strong enough to cause damage and needless to say there will be disruption.
3:00 pm
hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm martin croxall. today at 3:00. a landmark free speech victory at the high court, for a man who was warned by police about allegedly transphobic messages on social media. this is a watershed moment for liberty. the police were wrong to visit my workplace, wrong to check my thinking. the number of cases of mumps in england is its highest for a decade after a number of outbreaks in universities and colleges. we are here to deliver for the people of this country, my my face was just puffed out, so swollen. borisjohnson's new cabinet meets for the first time since yesterday's dramatic resignation of the chancellor sajid javid.
3:01 pm
coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. england have a point to prove in south africa. england's cricketers have a job on their hands this afternoon — it's the second of three t20 internationals — two days after they were beaten by a single run. can they avoid heartbreak again? beaten by a single run. thanks. beaten by a single run. and tomasz has all the weather. beaten by a single run. a beaten by a single run. week ago it was about stor but a week ago it was about storm ciara but now it's storm dennis. that's right, storm dennis is expected to bring three days of severe weather starting tomorrow on saturday lasting through sunday into monday and we will see waves of very heavy rain particularly disruptive and damaging winds. thanks, tomasz. also coming up — how did a mafia boss go from the streets of naples to hiding out in a lancashire caravan park? hello.
3:02 pm
this is afternoon live — i'm martine croxall. in a landmark case on freedom of expression, a high courtjudge has warned police against acting like the gestapo or the stasi when they investigate allegedly transphobic comments on social media. thejudge ruled that humberside police acted disproportionately when they turned up at harry miller's place of work and told him his tweets about tra nsgender people were a "hate incident." the judge said the police visit had a potentially chilling effect on free speech, saying "we have never lived in an 0rwellian society". our legal correspondent, clive coleman is at the high court. harry miller believes that a man cannot become a woman and he says he tweets and blogs as part of a public discussion about the reform of the gender recognition act, that is the act under which a man can legally be recognised as a woman and vice versa. there's a very heated discussion about proposed reforms. at the moment, the criteria are stringent and the proposals
3:03 pm
are that they should become less so. he tweets in a way some people would find offensive, he uses pretty crude language, swearwords, body parts and so forth. injanuary 2019, a transwoman complained about his tweets. that led humberside police to go to his place of work, they eventually interviewed him over the phone and warned him if he continued to tweet in the way he had been, then he could be prosecuted as a result. the incident was logged as this strange thing — "a non—crime hate incident". that isn't without consequence, because it can be disclosed on an enhanced disclosure and barring check, if someone's seeking to work for an employer who deals with disabled groups, vulnerable groups, and so forth. harry millerjudicially reviewed both the guidance and behaviour of humberside police. the guidance grew out of the stephen lawrence case,
3:04 pm
that tragic case, and the idea behind it is that you damp down hate incidents before they escalate into full—blown hate crimes. he judicially reviewed both the guidance and the behaviour of humberside police. today, mrjusticejulian knowles ruled that the guidance was entirely lawful, but the way it had been applied by humberside police was a disproportionate interference with harry miller's right to freedom of expression. 0utside court, harry miller was delighted. we have never had a gestapo or a stasi in great britain. but the actions of humberside police came way too close for comfort. this is a watershed moment for liberty. the police were wrong to visit my workplace, wrong to check my thinking, wrong in their attempt to force me the stonewall and now the labour party trans rights pledge. the words of mrjusticejulian
3:05 pm
knowles will be seen by many as a robust defence of the right to freedom of expression, and he talked in his ruling about the right to be offensive in what you say. he says, freedom of speech which is entirely inoffensive is a right not worth having. but of course, that's not the view of everybody in terms of this case, and the trans community, and we've spoken to a number of groups in researching this story, they've reacted in a different way. this is helen belcherfrom the organisation trans media watch. i think trans people will be worried that it could become open season on us, because the court didn't really define what the threshold for acceptable speech was. and i think it willjust reinforce an opinion that the courts don't really understand trans lives and aren't there to protect trans people.
3:06 pm
so, the wording of this judgment i think will be studied very carefully by police forces around the country, because it really sets the tone of what is completely free and legitimate comment, online in particular. and i think it will determine, when people make a complaint, whether the police do investigate and whether they log this as "a non—crime hate incident". something like in excess of 25,000 non—crime hate incidents are logged by uk police each year. this is a big issue for the police, and they will be picking over this ruling very carefully. the number of people diagnosed with mumps in england is the highest for a decade. 5,000 cases were confirmed last year — almost five times more than the year before. public health england says it's partly down to people not getting the mmr vaccine in the 1990s and early 2000s.
3:07 pm
tim muffett reports. i would literally be screaming from being in pain. lectures, essays, the odd party, and mumps — flora, ben and 0llie's second year at leeds university hasn't gone quite to plan. i went to bed normal, like, normal chin, fine, everything fine. but then i woke up and, bang, my face was just puffed out, so swollen. were you surprised as to how painful it was? i got prescribed morphine, it was that bad. it started out with just pain in my ear and jaw. and then, it kind of started swelling. so painful. like, yourjaw pretty much locks and i could open my mouth this much. brushing my teeth, felt a lump around here and started swelling up. yeah, had pretty fat face. other students who have had mumps have been sharing before and after photos.
3:08 pm
the number of cases in england is at its highest level in a decade and many universities and colleges have seen outbreaks. there were more than 5,000 laboratory—confirmed cases of mumps last year — almost five times the number seen in 2018. last month alone, there were nearly three times as many cases as the previous january. today's young adults were born in the late ‘90s and early 2000s and was when the measles, mumps and rubella vaccination was incorrectly linked to autism, creating a panic amongst parents. now, the link has been proved to be false, but many children missed out on their mmr jab. the cohort of young people who weren't vaccinated are now at university, getting to know each other, sharing their bugs, and that's meant we've seen this huge increase in cases. around half of mumps cases last year were amongst unvaccinated people, according to public health england. but many, like flora, ben and ollie, did have the mmrjab
3:09 pm
and the follow—up booster. and yet, they still got mumps. the challenge is that the mumps element of the vaccine isn't quite as effective as it is for measles and rubella. the more people that are vaccinated, the harder it is for the bugs to get around to be shared in the first place. so, even if you have had two mmr jabs, you could still potentially get mumps, partly because a lot of people didn't and, therefore, the virus is more prevalent. precisely. mumps typically passes with no lasting damage. those who have had an mmr jab are less likely to suffer serious complications. on rare occasions, it can lead to hearing loss, viral meningitis, and infertility in men. anyone unsure if they've had an mmrjab or booster is advised to see a doctor. with vaccinations, it's never too late to catch up. tim muffett, bbc news. earlier, i spoke to dr vanessa saliba consultant epidemiologist at public health england. she said young people should check whether they're up to date with their mmr vaccines.
3:10 pm
the current spike is being driven by outbreaks in colleges and universities. pretty much all the cases are in people between 15 and even up to 35 who missed out on the measles, mumps and rubella vaccination when they were younger and they are all together at university and it is a good environment for spreading the infection and that is why we are seeing an increase in mumps at the moment. young people should check they are up—to—date with their mmr vaccination. there was a lot of controversy, not scientifically backed, about the mmr vaccine. these young people were born in the late 90s, early 2000, and at that time the uptake of the vaccine dropped to about 20% which is the lowest we have ever had in this country
3:11 pm
and we are still paying the price for it now. nowadays as well, we still offer the mmr vaccine to all one—year—olds, the first dose and then a second dose when they start school. it is important everyone gets the vaccine that the right time. if you check in with your parents and guardians and they say we did not have you done now we realise we publish should have, what should they do? they should check with their gp practice. they should have a record. if they have no record, get caught up now. it is completely free on the nhs. there is no upper age limit. if you are not sure, there is no harm in getting extra doses. it is safe and effective and the best way to make sure you do get mumps. ——sure you do not get mumps. it is not very nice, is it? not at all. you getjointache and headache and then you get swelling over here on either side of the cheeks,
3:12 pm
a swelling of the parotid gland which can be rather painful. it takes a week or two to resolve. if you have the symptoms you should contact your gp or 111. there can be complications and some people can end up in hospital. that is why it is important to have the vaccine. these photos are almost like some of the filters you can use on your phone but these are real pictures, aren't they? how could is the uptake of the mmr at the moment? ——how good is the uptake of the mmr at the moment? the current uptake of the mmr vaccine is pretty good, 95% uptake of the first dose. we want people to get the vaccine as soon as possible when they turn one. having two doses ensures you have long—term protection. we encourage all parents to take up the offer of that when it comes up.
3:13 pm
the body of a missing british woman has been found by police in new zealand. stephanie simpson is thought to have gone on a hike last weekend in the mount aspiring national park in the country's south island. the police have previously found items belonging to the 32—year—old from essex. public health england has confirmed that a person diagnosed with the coronavirus attended a transport conference in central london last week. more than 200 delegates have been informed, but told their risk of infection is low. labour mp for leeds north west alex sobel confirmed in a statement today that he attended the conference and has cancelled all of his engagements until next week when the 14 day potential incubation will be over. meanwhile, health officials in china have reported 121 more deaths from the coronavirus outbreak bringing the total number to almost 1,400. the number of confirmed cases of the virus rose by more than 5,000. but the world health organisation says cases are not rising dramatically outside china
3:14 pm
despite a spike in hubei province. the court of appeal has ruled doctors can stop providing medical treatment for a brain dead baby. three appeal judges analysed evidence on four—month—old midrar ali after a high courtjudge concluded that treatment could be withdrawn. midrar‘s father said the ruling was "terrible", after arguing their son had been showing "signs of life". but doctors at st mary's hospital in manchester said midrar should be allowed a "kind and dignified death". it's been almost a week now since more than 135,000 residents have been without online public services as their council struggles with a cyber—attack. redcar and cleveland borough council's website and all computers at the authority were attacked on saturday — they're now having to use pen and paper rather than computers. 0ne cyber—security expert told the bbc the incident had all the hallmarks of a ransomware attack, in which files are scrambled until a ransom is paid. 0ur cybersecurity reporter
3:15 pm
joe tidyjoins me now. what is ra nsomwa re? what is ransomware? it's a type of attack where hackers gain entry to a computer system and they will scramble all the files, encrypting them and making them useless to the user, and then keeping them that way until a ransom is paid. sometimes it's hundreds of thousands, sometimes its millions. we don't know whether or not this is ra nsomwa re, we're know whether or not this is ransomware, we're fairly certain. the council aren't giving much away. they are keeping a lot of the information to themselves, they haven't said the nature of the attack and simply that there is an ongoing cyber attack. from what we do know, all computers are down in the entire borough council, all websites are down which means you can't access your planning applications or your information about bin collections or anything thatis about bin collections or anything that is ongoing, basically, anything
3:16 pm
done through the website is now being done over the phone, if you can find being done over the phone, if you canfind a being done over the phone, if you can find a phone number. the only way to get that information is on the facebook and twitter feeds of the facebook and twitter feeds of the councils. you can pay money to the councils. you can pay money to the council on a different system. that's the only thing that is working, your ability to pay the council. all the services, they are locked out. if it is ransomware, what are the options? the options are don't pay or pay. the hackers, if this is the case, we'll have said we have your systems and we need this amount of money or we are going to comic you'll never get it back or we will delete everything. so you pay them and get your systems back, thejury is pay them and get your systems back, the jury is out on how much it will actually get back. you're dealing with cyber criminals, so they say you have a word that if you pay as you have a word that if you pay as you will get back your systems but isn't always the case. the other option is to not pay them and rebuild from scratch. i know from speaking to someone at the council, they are rebuilding some of them but
3:17 pm
haven't said whether they are paying the hackers. they haven't actually given the public much information about it at all. there is no personal sensitive data that has been taken but they haven't said whether or not it is still in the system but encrypted. so whether they have control of it. that is a com pletely they have control of it. that is a completely different question entirely. cyber insurance is something they could have bought but it would be nice to know. that's what i've been asking all day, whether they have cyber insurance. whether or not they pay or whether they rebuild, and even if it isn't ra nsomwa re, they rebuild, and even if it isn't ransomware, this they rebuild, and even if it isn't ra nsomwa re, this is they rebuild, and even if it isn't ransomware, this is costing a lot of money. you've got security experts charging thousands of pounds a day, they've been up at the council working on it since saturday and they charge a lot of money and that is all coming out of the public purse. whether they have to rebuild or pay the hackers, it might come out of insurance or the public‘s money. you would be glad if the council picked the phone up to you.
3:18 pm
i would, they've stopped answering michael's. —— my pulls delete maclean calls. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. a landmark free speech victory at the high court, for a man who was warned by police about allegedly transphobic messages on social media. the number of cases of mumps in england is its highest for a decade after a number of utbreaks in universities and colleges. borisjohnson's new cabinet meets for the first time since yesterday's dramatic resignation of the chancellor sajid javid. england's cricketers return to action for the second of the t20 internationals. they were beaten by one run as eoin morgan's squad continue preparations for the t20 world cup. 0rganisers of the olympic games are insisting coronavirus will not have any impact on the competition in tokyo. they say they are monitoring it closely. and ronnie 0'sullivan is through to the semifinals of the welsh open. he beat mark selby. i will be back at
3:19 pm
3:30pm. borisjohnson's new cabinet has met for the first time since yesterday's dramatic reshuffle which saw sajid javid resign as chancellor. the prime minister told his new team they have to get on with delivering the government's priorities. at his side was rishi sunak — his new chancellor — who's due to deliver his first budget in just a few weeks' time. here's our political correspondent iain watson. a new cabinet and borisjohnson would like us to think it is also a new government, one with different priorities from the previous conservative administrations. borisjohnson's new next door neighbour at number 11 downing st is a former investment banker, rishi sunak, and he has to find the cash for number 10's plans. this new cabinet minister says appointing a chancellor with a seat in yorkshire demonstrates
3:20 pm
a commitment to northern england. i'm sorry, we seem to be having problems with the sound on that report. we will return to it later. well, one of the cabinet casulaties yesterday — was the northern ireland secretary julian smith — just weeks after he helped strike a deal to restore power sharing at stormont. jonathan evershed is from the department of government and politics at university college cork, hejoins me now. first, what has the reaction been on both sides of the border tojulian smith losing his job? the big news on the other side of the irish sea might have been sajid javid to's resignation but very much for us on this side of the irish sea, on both sides of the border, julian smith's departure from the office of secretary of state for northern ireland is much bigger news i think. i think that the well of both arlene
3:21 pm
foster, the leader of the dup, and leo varadkar the now outgoing taoiseach and the respect shown to julian smith by both of those figures is really a testament to his ha rd figures is really a testament to his hard work and success that he had in the role. it is a very sad day for all of us on both sides of the border. yesterday was a very sad day, very sad to see him go. he will be missed. some up what it was that julian smith had managed to achieve in quitea julian smith had managed to achieve in quite a short period of time, really. a remarkably short period of time. he of course, with his cou nterpa rts time. he of course, with his counterparts in the irish government simon coveney who also will be likely outgoing as a result of the recent irish general election, played a pivotal role in securing the new decade, new approach to get
3:22 pm
power—sharing back on the road, bringing all parties into government again in northern ireland. that is a serious achievement. he was operating on a new political context, new electoral pressure is on the dup and sinn fein and the end of the confidence and supply arrangement between the dup and the conservative party. so, he had luck on his side but to get those parties around the table to present them with this deal and to offer all of those parties enough to go back into power—sharing government, as i say, was a remarkable achievement in a very short amount of time. given his success and given how he was regarded by the different parties in this, in politics in ireland and northern ireland, why would he be
3:23 pm
replaced? why would brandon lewis seem replaced? why would brandon lewis seem to be a better fit for boris johnson? you will have to ask boris johnson? you will have to ask boris johnson that question, but...“ only! well, quite! i would love johnson that question, but...“ only! well, quite! iwould love to asking that question myself, frankly. i thinkjulian smith developed a reputation as someone who took the northern ireland question very seriously. i think dare i say it more seriously than some of his predecessors and was clearly articulating some of the real challenges that brexit and the prime minister's approach to brexit still pays for northern ireland, still pays for northern ireland, still a lot of unresolved questions about what this new so—called border in the irish sea might look like. someone has said that if there was an elephant in the rain thenjulian smith was the one to point it out. that is obviously something that the
3:24 pm
prime minister and his team didn't wa nt prime minister and his team didn't want as they approach the new face of brexit negotiations, these new trade talks. i would love to know the logic. it is very hard to understand from our position. from our position on the other side of the irish sea but the real thinking is. there are some reports suggesting borisjohnson was in some way blindsided by the deal, may be the fact it did come to fruition where other people had failed and there was that inclusion of a commitment to investigate actions by british soldiers during the troubles. how much might that have been a factor? again, this is all quite well—known, i think. julian smith did take a degree of risk in seeking that agreement but ultimately, there's mechanisms for dealing with the past that you're
3:25 pm
talking about, which include not only the possibility of prosecution isa only the possibility of prosecution is a british soldiers but also of paramilitaries on is a british soldiers but also of pa ramilitaries on both is a british soldiers but also of paramilitaries on both sides of the conflict. those are a set of institutions and arrangements that have been agreed by all parties in northern ireland and alljulian smith was doing really was giving effect in the new deal to what had already previously been agreed. so, i think that one of the challenges confronting brandon lewis as he comes into this position will be how to carry forward but very delicate, very delicate question of dealing with the past. i think there are some worrying signs from the government in its rhetoric around so—called vexatious prosecutions. i think we need to seriously question what they mean by that and they could play, there is a serious risk of destabilising relationships in northern ireland if this issue isn't
3:26 pm
handled very delicately and sensitively bite brandon lewis. thank you. ——sensitively by brandon lewis. the scottish conservatives have a new leader. jackson, who has been interim leader since the resignation of ruth davidson in august, received more than three times the votes of the only other candidate, michelle ballantyne. coming up on afternoon live. how one of naples most powerful mafia bosses ended up hiding out in a lancashire caravan park. time for a look at the weather. storm dennis is on the way to take over where storm ciara left off. it's incredible, in the space of a week we've got another really big storm on the way. again, like last week, there is an amber warning in force from the met office but this time the amber warning is more linked to the amount of rainfall rather than the wind. the thinking is that some parts of the country could have more than a month's worth
3:27 pm
of rainfall in a short space of time. i think this isjust a general warning but all the specific areas of where we think the heaviest rain, or rather the met office, that is on the website. head of storm dennis, there is another system but it probably won't affect us. that's right. i will show you the satellite picture. this is a separate storm, it isa picture. this is a separate storm, it is a very impressive swell of cloud. some ferocious conditions out across the atlantic right now, producing hurricane force winds on the beaufort scale. that is impacting iceland so they have got red warnings. places like reykjavik i believe will get something like up to two metres of snow. we have a relatively far away from the storm and its cold front is literally whisking across the uk bringing a bit of rainfall. all ice a bit further towards, actually, this is where that storm is closer to
3:28 pm
iceland but now i'm going to pan out across the atlantic. this is where storm dennis is. literally, this whole area of weather energy is stretching from that part of the atlantic. in fact, all the way to the eastern seaboard and the origins you can the eastern seaboard and the origins you can even see the eastern seaboard and the origins you can even see in the gulf of mexico. so, huge, huge distance. you can even see in the gulf of mexico. so, huge, huge distancem looks like storm ciara did. that's right. there is a sense of deja vu. such a large system and the fact it is so large will have an impact on how long it is going to take to go through. and the gradient of these isobars which show the incredibly low pressure in this system. that's right. it's possible that over the next day or two, we will be approaching a record low pressures in the storm. pressure is basically a measure of how fast inside the storm the air is rising upwards. so,
3:29 pm
if it is rising upwards in the storm, something needs to go back into it to replace that void. there is that whole air in the atmosphere rushing inside the storm. the more lines we had, we sometimes miss few refer to those as a deep sink. how low could it be? we think it could go down to 917 millibars, which is incredibly low. the record isjust a few millibars lower incredibly low. the record isjust a few milliba rs lower than incredibly low. the record isjust a few millibars lower than that. this far in advance, we can't be sure of the forecast at that level of detail but it is going to be one of the most intense storms we will have recorded at least in the atlantic. we will be quite far away from it, relatively speaking, but we are still going to be feeling the effects. i tell us the worst. just
3:30 pm
like last weekend, voracious weather on the way and the basic message is because it is such a large storm it is going to take a while to barrel three. it isn't one uniform area of wind and rain. some people may get the worst of the weather on saturday or sunday, others sunday night into monday. this is the beginning of the storm on saturday morning, widespread heavy rain and widespread gales. in wales, the south west, parts of yorkshire and southern scotland, thatis yorkshire and southern scotland, that is where the amber warnings are in force from the met office. we could get 80 millimetres of rain in some places, enough to cause significant flooding. in some areas that gusts of wind will be similar to ciara, in other areas, a little
3:31 pm
less. the storm is going to come in waves. there might be some lulls, even a bit of sunshine. sunday could be particularly wet and nasty across the southern area of the uk. yorkshire will be very blustery with gales but there could be sunshine in places like leeds or sheffield. there could be a sting in the tail is the storm continued to barrel through. sunday night into monday especially nasty wins. there is a lot happening. not the typical storm that goes through and it is, then a night or so, we are talking about three days nasty weather and knock—on effects. the amber warning in force from the met office. severe gales on the posts and gales in land and the risk of damage and disruption from a combination of these factors here. just like last weekend, i will use the same words, batten down the hatches.
3:32 pm
3:33 pm
this is bbc news. our latest headlines... a landmark free speech victory at the high court, for a man who was warned by police about allegedly transphobic messages on social media. the number of cases of mumps in england is its highest for a decade after a number of outbreaks in universities and colleges. borisjohnson's new cabinet meets for the first time since yesterday's dramatic resignation of the chancellor sajid javid. coronavirus is not on the rise outside of china despite a sharp spike in hubei province, according to the world health organisation. # fool me once, fool me twice # are you death or paradise? that's the song for the new bond film, recorded by billie eilish. we'll find out how it's gone down with the critics.
3:34 pm
sport now on afternoon live with holly. england's cricketers are back in action later this afternoon, and they've got something to prove. yes, it's the second of three t20 internationals in durban, getting underway in the next half hour. and for england they really need to improve on their performance in east london on wednesday. when they let victory slip through theirfingers, they were chasing just seven in the final over but ended up losing by a single run. heartbreaking. also keeping mind, this is a side that will be very aware of the upcoming t20 world cup on october. so eoin morgan's men will be looking to showjust what they're capable of — every player looking to secure their place in that squad. among them chrisjordan — a t20 regular — but despite the slip up on wednesday, he feels england are ready for this autumn's tournament. this team now has been together in one form for quite some time now. there is a lot of experience in the team and a lot of the guys in the team have played in a lot
3:35 pm
of cricket around the world. being put under immense pressure at various times in their career. as a team we are in a good place and, like anything with tournaments and anything, we want to be gathering momentum going into the tournament. not long to go now — that match begins at 4 o'clock in durban. there will be live text commentary on the bbc sport website. roses are red, violets are blue, england have won world cup, they must improve to make it two. matthew wrote that on the website. i have noticed you have the right shirt on on the website. nothing is left to chance. never pull, one of their key
3:36 pm
players, key men like to be called up players, key men like to be called up to play in the olympics. —— liverpool. no sala has been included in the provisional squad for egypt, the final being on the 8th of august. jurgen klopp said he wants more information before he decides whether or not to let him play. do i want to lose a player pre—season? of course not but we have to consider different things. we are completely clear about what we want. we need more information. golf's european tour has announced the postponement of two tournaments in april because the coronavirus outbreak. the maybank championship in malaysia, scheduled to start on april 16th, and the following week's china open have been called off. discussions are ongoing
3:37 pm
regarding the possibility of rescheduling both events later in the year. the world health organisation has insisted there is no case for relocating or cancelling tokyo 2020 because of the coronavirus outbreak. the ioc has been told it should be able to go ahead as planned. itjust reinforced our confidence that the measures being taken by the relevant authorities are properly addressing the situation, along with china and that we will be able to ensure obviously that the games go ahead and that they go ahead in a way that is safe for the athletes and the spectators. ronnie 0'sullivan is through to the semi finals at the welsh 0pen snooker. he breezed past mark selby 5—1 and looked in supremely impressive form, racing into a 4—0 lead, which included a break of 142 in frame two. defending champion neil robertson
3:38 pm
is currently playing kyren wilson. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. donald trump's attorney general has criticised the president for tweeting about high—profile cases. william barr'sjustice department is currently under scrutiny over its decision to seek a shorter prison sentence for mr trump's long—time friend, roger stone, who was found guilty of lying to congress. mr barr insists he always acts independently, and he's urged the president to end his commentary on social media. david willis reports. up to now, william barr has been a staunch defender of president trump. but earlier this week, he found himself at the centre of a huge row after thejustice department overruled a recommendation by its own prosecution team and told a judge that a sentence of up to nine years injail for roger stone was inappropriate, only hours after president trump had tweeted, saying the punishment was too harsh.
3:39 pm
thejustice department's move prompted the entire prosecution team in the case to withdraw and mr barr has now gone public to assert his department's impartiality, suggesting also that the president stops tweeting. to have public statements and tweets made about the department, about our people in the department, men and women here, about cases pending in the department, and aboutjudges before whom we have cases make it impossible for me to do myjob and to assure the courts and the prosecutors in the department that we are doing our work with integrity. mr barr denied that there was a direct orderfrom the president to amend the sentence, although he called such tweets disruptive. this isn't the first time that president trump has been accused of attempting to influence the us justice department, and democrats are calling for an investigation.
3:40 pm
this is an abuse of power that the president is again trying to manipulate federal law enforcement to serve his political interest. and the president is what he is. he thinks he's above the law, he has no respect for the rule, but where are the republicans to speak out on this blatant violation? the president is not interfering because if you listen to the department ofjustice, they made the decision before the tweet ever went out. attorney general barr is coming before the committee as well, but there is no issue here. so far, the white house is saying only that the president is not bothered by william barr's comments and they are making the point that the president, just like any other american citizen, has the right to express his opinions publicly. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. pop star billie eilish has recorded the title track for the newjames bond film, no time to die.
3:41 pm
the us singer, who turned 18 last month, is the youngest artist in history to write and record a theme for the franchise. the song was released at midnight , at the same time as a new trailer for the film, starring daniel craig. name... bond. james bond. # that i'd fallen for a lie # you were never on my side # fool me once, fool me twice # are you death or paradise? # now you'll never see me cry # there's just no time to die.# joining me now is georgie rogers, a musicjournalist for bbc radio 6 music and others. what has the reaction been so far? it has been quite phenomenal, over 4
3:42 pm
million views for nine hours since it dropped. a lot of great reaction. people hailing at the best bond theme for a long time. it has the effect equal take of bille eilish on it. just kind of vulnerable and beautiful and haunting, older pop noir. she will have been given a brief that has to have the hallmarks ofa brief that has to have the hallmarks of a james bond theme but she will have wa nted of a james bond theme but she will have wanted to make it her own. what will she have said? her and her brother are a powerhouse in songwriting. they made her debut album which won all the grammys in her bedroom. they have been building
3:43 pm
up her bedroom. they have been building up their whole lives to write a bond theme. the whole 18 years. people are saying it will be a shoo in for the oscar. a bid to the sea change, a bit different. we are used to a p0p a bit different. we are used to a pop vocal belter. this is slightly different but the critics are very happy with it. it is not that massive anthemic thing you would have got from someone like shirley bassey. how true to the style of bille eilish is it? it is very true to her style, it has her stamp on it. she can sing anything. at the 0scars, she sang one of the most iconic songs of all time byjohn lennon, imagined this year. she has a way to convey emotion which is far beyond her years. you wonder what on earth is she going to do next if she and her brother have achieved this by the time she is 18? there are so
3:44 pm
many ways for her to collaborate. it will open a lot of doors, even more doors. she is already a global superstar. a lot of her fans, very loyal fa ns, superstar. a lot of her fans, very loyalfans, our superstar. a lot of her fans, very loyal fans, our younger demographic. there will be millions of people watching this film and it will bring her a whole new audience. she has already proved herself in the quality of the output she has put out there and i would imagine going forward is it willjust be more albums. if this is what she has made aged 18 and younger, it is quite astonishing really. good for coming in. thank you. donald trump's attorney as we've been hearing — a labour mp has put himself into isolation after attending an event where someone had coronavirus. alex sobel, who represents leeds north west, says he's been told he's "very low risk". let's beat him now. how are you
3:45 pm
feeling? i am feeling absolutely fine. no symptoms but no flu, no fever, no respiratory issues. tell us fever, no respiratory issues. tell us about the event we might have come into contact with the virus? the uk plus summit on the 6th of february happened. i was a side event on a bus in very enclosed space, a bus. an attendee at the event has been confirmed to have had the coronavirus. what advice where you'd given as a consequence? what was interesting as i did not find out about it through a letter or public health but because a journalist found out i was at the event and there had been a confirmed case and tweeted about it and then rang my office. that is why i found out. i am a bit concerned that sometimes if we had these cases, that we are not there in terms of being able to inform people, who
3:46 pm
we re being able to inform people, who were potential... have potential contact with the coronavirus and that does concern me. not the most reliable way to find out. what action did you take as a consequence? we connect locally, in leeds, i am a member of parliament and we contacted public health who gave us and we contacted public health who gave us some and we contacted public health who gave us some advice and told us to contact 111 and gave us the advice at the time. i am undertaking that process. because i am not showing any symptoms, i decided to take the additional proportion of self isolating and basically i cancelled two i should be at surgery now with local people and a very confined space. i decided to cancel surgery today and tomorrow and not attend any public engagement as a sensible and reasonable precaution. how are you going about trying to track ten
3:47 pm
anyone you came into contact with since the conference? obviously, i am on the media, this is the fourth media interview i had done this afternoon. social media as well as newsprint. it is obviously quite well known. i am concerned that i might not have found out. not people i was might not have found out. not people iwas in might not have found out. not people i was in contact with the people who we re i was in contact with the people who were at the uk plus summit when there was a case. people should look at the advice and the fact that you being in contact with someone at an event with coronavirus is not enough for you to take any precautions but if you yourself was at an event with somebody with coronavirus is quite different. the fact that nobody can confirm whether the person with coronavirus was in the same room as me isa coronavirus was in the same room as me is a concern. that is the gap actually that needs to be talked
3:48 pm
about. when you are at an event, public health financial whether were in contact or not. —— public health can confirm. it is not so much the advice, that is fine as far as it went. the advice needs to get to everybody. we need to have more resources put into public health. we are at the foothills of the coronavirus in the uk. it has not become a pandemic, there are only a few isolated cases. they need to put resources into tracking who has come into co nta ct resources into tracking who has come into contact with confirmed cases and if the number of cases do increase, we can keep that going and ensure that anybody that does develop symptoms is quarantine straightaway and people know that is a potential cause of their illness. if they are unaware, then how will they know? how will they know to
3:49 pm
ta ke they know? how will they know to take the steps? we hope you do not show any signs. thank you for talking to us and stay busy but in your self—imposed isolation. thank your self—imposed isolation. thank you for talking to us. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. a landmark free speech victory at the high court, for a man who was warned by police about allegedly transphobic messages on social media. the number of cases of mumps in england is its highest for a decade after a number of outbreaks in universities and colleges. borisjohnson's new cabinet meets for the first time since yesterday's dramatic resignation of the chancellor sajid javid. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. royal bank of scotland is changing its name later this year to natwest. natwest is one of the bank brands rbs owns. it also owns ulster bank. it's thought that the name change is designed to help break its association
3:50 pm
with the financial crisis. the bank was rescued by the government in 2008 in the aftermath of that. it is still 62% state—owned. today it also said profits doubled to £3.1 billion. tesco has been told not to illegally block rival supermarkets from buying its land or leasing nearby sites. a competition investigation found that on 23 occasions the uk's biggest supermarket chain blocked access to rivals using restrictive contracts. tesco has agreed to take action to avoid this in the future. the supermarket giant blamed "administrative errors" and said it had strengthened its "controls and training." broadband, tv and phone customers will be given the chance to avoid price rises when their contracts end under rules that come in on saturday. uk watchdog 0fcom says users could save £150 a year on broadband alone — once they have checked out available alternative deals. around 20 million customers
3:51 pm
are out of contract with their suppliers and could switch to something cheaper. it's the start of london fashion week. it's a big deal. who's coming? we will talk to someone and find out ina we will talk to someone and find out in a moment. among the big names coming, a wakeley, tommy hilfiger, victoria beckham, paul costello. i think i will stop there. some very big names. give an idea of importance to the uk economy. employment alone, it employs almost 1 million people, a lot of those 0n retail you will not be surprised to hear. that is an important part of the british fashion landscape. the industry accounts for 5% of gdp, a huge amount of imports and exports
3:52 pm
going on in the industry and also some of the biggest companies in the uk are fashion companies. you start with burberry, we can talk about m&s there we had homeware and food in that but also aysoss and nnext from leicestershire. and enderby. the jacket. caroline rush is chief executive of the british fashion council. be talked earlier about the importance of the fashion industry to the uk at large. and i missed anything out? 32 billion to the british economy. in terms of size, we are similarto british economy. in terms of size, we are similar to powers and telecom. a big contribution to the coffers. i was saying to martin, it
3:53 pm
was in its 15th year. how much has it grown since then? —— martine. was in its 15th year. how much has it grown since then? —— martinem is 35 years old. a global showcase, one of the big four alongside new york, milan and paris, where the greatest of our businesses show their luxury wares. they are known for their big brands like burberry, but also the incredible emerging talent we have in this country, which creates aspiration and the trend that happens around the world. pa rt trend that happens around the world. part of the growth of the fashion industry is the growth of fast fashion. 0ne industry is the growth of fast fashion. one of the nastiest elements of that is low wages in countries that supply is the we wear and the growth in throwaway fashion.
3:54 pm
what will be talked about on that front? we are putting sustainability and impactand front? we are putting sustainability and impact and environment front and centre. we had a showcase of young businesses only hoping to build from a sustainable point of view. new business models, rental, looking at the circular economy and working with some of the bigger brands to work out how we can help them change their impact on the planet. later we will launch the institute of positive fashion to help engage all the businesses and start them on the path to reduce their impact. some of the big companies do rely on throwaway fashion, like asos. another problem is the coronavirus with goods coming out of china. what effect are you saying there? the fashion industry is a global ecosystem. there businesses that are
3:55 pm
pa rt ecosystem. there businesses that are part of london fashion week will have samples and collections made in mainland china. quite a lot of the fashions have closed. retail stores are closed or on reduced hours. consumers are wanting to stay at home are not the end public places and socialise. the impact on sales at the moment is significant. not knowing how long it will go on for isa knowing how long it will go on for is a real challenge for businesses and every day it is being addressed. from the prospect of london fashion week we are using digital and everywhere we plan to reach the media and retail audiences so we can continue to do business. this morning we announced a new partnership with a consumer platform called fashions due to make sure british designers and chinese designers and two fashion industries are designers and two fashion industries a re closely designers and two fashion industries are closely collected and the two programmes will start in september
3:56 pm
right the way through to 2022. —— fashion zoo. -- fashion zoo. the markets. i was looking forward to the rabbit story. the 100 share index is down slightly. the dowjones has barely changed. deal prices max stronger. —— the oil price is much stronger. a newly reprocessed version of the image known as "the pale blue dot" has been released for the 30th anniversary of it's capture. nasa's voyager 1 spacecraft took this iconic picture of the earth from a distance of 3.8 billion miles. the astronomer carl sagan once said of the image — "that's us. on it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever
3:57 pm
heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives." no wonder we feel so insignificant. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz schafernaker. the storms are relentless across the atla ntic the storms are relentless across the atlantic at the moment and we have some very atlantic at the moment and we have some very nasty where on its way. this is an amber warning specifically for very heavy rain, likely to affect northern, western and southern areas of the uk. 0ver the period of a couple of days we could see more than a months worth of rainfall and that means flooding. this is not storm tennis, it is wreaking havoc in iceland. this is storm tennis and it will be approaching us through the course of tonight and into tomorrow. —— storm dennis. this is the beginning, the
3:58 pm
outer edge of storm dennis. the winds will start to freshen across many western areas during the course of the night and on saturday there we re of the night and on saturday there were locations —— the weather conditions will be going downhill. 0n conditions will be going downhill. on top of that there will be severe gales. the winds may not be as strong as with storm ciara. the effects of the storm could be comparable to what we had last time. it isa comparable to what we had last time. it is a sustained period of strong winds which will take us into monday, particularly around the posts. we could see guests about to 70 miles an hour or more and easily gale force in you can see their weather systems, the whole weather system, storm dennis continues into sunday and monday as well. some particularly nasty weather. 0n sunday in the south of the country thatis sunday in the south of the country that is where we could see heavy rain in the south and an extra push
3:59 pm
a very strong winds as well. the temperature is very mild in the south. quite often the storms bring mild air, 15 degrees. a bit cold in scotland, around 68 celsius. sunday night into monday, again we have severe gales expected across the northern half of the uk. storm dennis is relentless when taking us into the early hours of monday morning. the disruption is likely to last more than a few days. it is likely to be very nasty of weather. —— a very nasty spell of weather.
4:00 pm
hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm martine croxall. today at 4:00. a landmark free speech victory at the high court, for a man who was warned by police about allegedly transphobic messages on social media. this is a watershed moment for liberty. the police were wrong to visit my workplace, wrong to check my thinking. the number of cases of mumps in england is its highest for a decade after a number of outbreaks in universities and colleges. i went to bed normal, like, normal chin, fine, everything fine. but then i woke up and, bang, my face was just puffed out, so swollen. borisjohnson's new cabinet meets for the first time since yesterday's dramatic resignation of the chancellor sajid javid. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — with holly hamilton.
4:01 pm
starting in durban, south africa have won the toss and opted to bowl first as england look to avoid heartbreak in the second t20 international. thanks holly, and we'll bejoining you for a full update just after half—past. tomasz schafernaker has all the weather. storm dennis bearing down on the uk, we will start to feel the effects from tomorrow and the effects of the storm could last into monday. disruption, flooding and damage are likely. also coming up — we'll find out how one lancashire village is preparing for the arrival of storm dennis to protect homes flooded during storm ciara. that's coming up on nationwide.
4:02 pm
hello — this is afternoon live — i'm martine croxall. in a landmark case on freedom of expression, a high courtjudge has warned police against acting like the gestapo or the stasi when they investigate allegedly transphobic comments on social media. thejudge ruled that humberside police acted disproportionately when they turned up at harry miller's place of work and told him his tweets about tra nsgender people were a "hate incident." the judge said the police visit had a potentially chilling effect on free speech, saying "we have never lived in an 0rwellian society". our legal correspondent clive coleman is at the high court. harry miller believes that a man cannot become a woman and he says he tweets and blogs as part of a public discussion about the reform of the gender recognition act, that is the act under which a man can legally be recognised as a woman and vice versa. there's a very heated discussion about proposed reforms. at the moment, the criteria
4:03 pm
are stringent and the proposals are that they should become less so. he tweets in a way some people would find offensive, he uses pretty crude language, swearwords, body parts and so forth. injanuary 2019, a transwoman complained about his tweets. that led humberside police to go to his place of work, they eventually interviewed him over the phone and warned him if he continued to tweet in the way he had been, then he could be prosecuted as a result. the incident was logged as this strange thing — "a non—crime hate incident". that isn't without consequence, because it can be disclosed on an enhanced disclosure and barring check, if someone's seeking to work for an employer who deals with disabled groups, vulnerable groups, and so forth. harry millerjudicially reviewed both the guidance and behaviour of humberside police. the guidance grew out of the stephen lawrence case,
4:04 pm
that tragic case, and the idea behind it is that you damp down hate incidents before they escalate into full—blown hate crimes. he judicially reviewed both the guidance and the behaviour of humberside police. today, mrjusticejulian knowles ruled that the guidance was entirely lawful, but the way it had been applied by humberside police was a disproportionate interference with harry miller's right to freedom of expression. 0utside court, harry miller was delighted. we have never had a gestapo or a stasi in great britain. but the actions of humberside police came way too close for comfort. this is a watershed moment for liberty. the police were wrong to visit my workplace, wrong to check my thinking, wrong in their attempt to force me the stonewall and now the labour party trans rights pledge.
4:05 pm
the words of mrjusticejulian knowles will be seen by many as a robust defence of the right to freedom of expression, and he talked in his ruling about the right to be offensive in what you say. he says, freedom of speech which is entirely inoffensive is a right not worth having. but of course, that's not the view of everybody in terms of this case, and the trans community, and we've spoken to a number of groups in researching this story, they've reacted in a different way. this is helen belcherfrom the organisation trans media watch. i think trans people will be worried that it could become open season on us, because the court didn't really define what the threshold for acceptable speech was. and i think it willjust reinforce an opinion that the courts don't really understand trans lives and aren't there to protect trans people.
4:06 pm
so, the wording of this judgment i think will be studied very carefully by police forces around the country, because it really sets the tone of what is completely free and legitimate comment, online in particular. and i think it will determine, when people make a complaint, whether the police do investigate and whether they log this as "a non—crime hate incident". something like in excess of 25,000 non—crime hate incidents are logged by uk police each year. this is a big issue for the police, and they will be picking over this ruling very carefully. adam wagner is a barrister — he has called the harry miller case the most important on free speech and social media in years. hejoins us now. how important is this distinction
4:07 pm
that thisjudgment how important is this distinction that this judgment has sought to draw? i think it's very important. whether it actually changes the law, i don't think it does, but what it does do is draw a very clear line between what is acceptable speech in the wider context and what is criminal speech. the line it draws really is at the point where something becomes targeted hate speech at a particular person, and where it isn't is generalised, even offensive, hurtful, not complex speech around a particular debate. what thejudge speech around a particular debate. what the judge clearly said is that shouldn't be criminalised and shouldn't be criminalised and shouldn't be criminalised and shouldn't be a matter for the police. how difficult does it make it for the police to know where they should intervene and where they shouldn't? what is an incident and what is a crime? it is extremely difficult because on the one hand
4:08 pm
there is this policy that requires that recording of noncriminal incidents for various reasons. that policy is lawful. the police are being asked to get involved in these incidents. thejudge being asked to get involved in these incidents. the judge said what the police shouldn't be doing is what they did in this case, calling up they did in this case, calling up the person in saying this is something you've got to be careful about and please don't tweet any similar stuff, which they shouldn't be doing, and the second thing is they shouldn't be turning up at their workplace and making things difficult for them there. it is a big mess on this at the moment because you also have a law that criminalises grace offence. what is grossly offensive is a question of what a particular person thinks it's grossly offensive. i don't think we can define that clearly enough that the criminal law. what more needs to happen to define that line very clearly? whether it is to do with
4:09 pm
objection to ideologies or whether it goes into a personal attack that could be insightful?” it goes into a personal attack that could be insightful? i think inciting violence will clearly fall over the line and inciting violence towards a particular person will clearly fall over the line. harassing a particular person, where you are creating an intimidating or hostile environment for them or undermining their dignity, then you get into harder areas. the issue around trans rights has put that at the full because, for example, misgender ring someone, is that harassment? —— misgendering someone. i think harassment? —— misgendering someone. ithink in harassment? —— misgendering someone. i think in certain incidents it is but should it full within the criminal law? is it the same as racial speech or racist abuse? it is really difficult and the courts are
4:10 pm
finding it difficult because of the emerging technology, social media and the fact we are now constantly engaging in extremely hostile debates online, in groups, without much thought about the consequences. a lot of people often say this is a matter for the police to consider but are the police really the best people to be considering the boundaries of free speech? i'm not sure they are. how might this judgment in harry miller case have a bearing on other cases to do with the freedom of belief? freedom of thought, particularly around biology and sex than gender? well, it is interesting because it comes on the heels of another case about that issue, about a woman who has a belief that biological sex is immutable and can't be changed. she
4:11 pm
was told by the employment tribunal that that wasn't a protected belief because it undermines the dignity of other people, namely trans people. thatjudgment will other people, namely trans people. that judgment will be other people, namely trans people. thatjudgment will be going to appeal. there is an open question, andi appeal. there is an open question, and i don't think an obvious answer, as to how this fits together with discrimination law and criminal law. what thisjudgment discrimination law and criminal law. what this judgment was clear about is that i think clive coleman got it right, it sets the tone for what is going to come. the tone will be that free speech has to be front and centre when you are considering even offensive speech and offensive speech has always been protected under human rights law, the first amendment to the us constitution which is referred to in the judgment. it comes down to what the boundary is between offence and a criminal act. i think we are going to carry on having these debates for
4:12 pm
a long time, as technology and social norms are changing. thank you. the number of people diagnosed with mumps in england is the highest for a decade. 5,000 cases were confirmed last year — almost five times more than the year before. public health england says it's partly down to people not getting the mmr vaccine in the 1990s and early 2000s. tim muffett reports. i would literally be screaming from being in pain. lectures, essays, the odd party, and mumps — flora, ben and 0llie's second year at leeds university hasn't gone quite to plan. i went to bed normal, like, normal chin, fine, everything fine. but then i woke up and, bang, my face was just puffed out, so swollen. were you surprised as to how painful it was? i got prescribed morphine, it was that bad. it started out with just
4:13 pm
pain in my ear and jaw. and then, it kind of started swelling. so painful. like, yourjaw pretty much locks and i could open my mouth this much. brushing my teeth, felt a lump around here and started swelling up. yeah, had pretty fat face. other students who have had mumps have been sharing before and after photos. the number of cases in england is at its highest level in a decade and many universities and colleges have seen outbreaks. there were more than 5,000 laboratory—confirmed cases of mumps last year — almost five times the number seen in 2018. last month alone, there were nearly three times as many cases as the previous january. today's young adults were born in the late ‘90s and early 2000s and was when the measles, mumps and rubella vaccination was incorrectly linked to autism, creating a panic amongst parents. now, the link has been proved to be
4:14 pm
false, but many children missed out on their mmr jab. the cohort of young people who weren't vaccinated are now at university, getting to know each other, sharing their bugs, and that's meant we've seen this huge increase in cases. around half of mumps cases last year were amongst unvaccinated people, according to public health england. but many, like flora, ben and ollie, did have the mmrjab and the follow—up booster. and yet, they still got mumps. the challenge is that the mumps element of the vaccine isn't quite as effective as it is for measles and rubella. the more people that are vaccinated, the harder it is for the bugs to get around to be shared in the first place. so, even if you have had two mmr jabs, you could still potentially get mumps, partly because a lot of people didn't and, therefore, the virus is more prevalent. precisely. mumps typically passes with no lasting damage. those who have had an mmr jab are less likely to suffer serious complications.
4:15 pm
on rare occasions, it can lead to hearing loss, viral meningitis, and infertility in men. anyone unsure if they've had an mmrjab or booster is advised to see a doctor. with vaccinations, it's never too late to catch up. tim muffett, bbc news. the body of a missing british woman has been found by police in new zealand. stephanie simpson is thought to have gone on a hike last weekend in the mount aspiring national park in the country's south island. the police have previously found items belonging to the 32—year—old from essex. the court of appeal has ruled doctors can stop providing medical treatment for a brain dead baby. three appeal judges analysed evidence on four—month—old midrar ali after a high courtjudge concluded that treatment could be withdrawn. midrar‘s father said the ruling was "terrible", after arguing their son had been showing "signs of life". but doctors at st mary's hospital in manchester said midrar should be allowed a "kind and dignified death".
4:16 pm
4:17 pm
4:18 pm
4:19 pm
4:20 pm
4:21 pm
4:22 pm
4:23 pm
4:24 pm
4:25 pm
4:26 pm
4:27 pm
4:28 pm
4:29 pm
4:30 pm
4:31 pm
4:32 pm
4:33 pm
4:34 pm
4:35 pm
4:36 pm
4:37 pm
4:38 pm
4:39 pm
4:40 pm
4:41 pm
4:42 pm
4:43 pm
4:44 pm
4:45 pm
4:46 pm
4:47 pm
4:48 pm
4:49 pm
4:50 pm
4:51 pm
4:52 pm
4:53 pm
4:54 pm
4:55 pm
4:56 pm
4:57 pm
4:58 pm
4:59 pm
5:00 pm

0 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on